LESEZIRKEL


(Stand Juni 2021)
 

 
AKTUELLE LEKTÜRE

 
VORSCHLÄGE ZUR LEKTÜRE
 
TURNUS DER GASTGEBERINNEN
 
ARCHIV
 

  

AKTUELLE LEKTÜRE


     
     
Vorschlag von
 
   Catherine, Christine, Mumi
 
Autorin
 
   Toni Morrison, 1931-2019, USA
 
 Titel
 
Sehr blaue Augen (The bluest Eyes 1970/1993)
 
Buch-Info Rowohlt Verlag, 1979/2019
     Deutsch aus dem Amerikanischen von Susanna Rademacher      Taschenbuch, 240 Seiten, 15 CHF
     eBook, 11 CHF
 
Beschreibung    siehe: de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sehr_blaue_Augen
       
 
       
Nächste Sitzung
 bei
   Donnerstag, 14. Juli 2021, 19:00 Uhr
Catherine

 


 
Seitenanfang
 

  

VORSCHLÄGE ZUR LEKTÜRE IM ZIRKEL


     
     
Vorschlag von
 
   Catherine, Christine, Mumi
 
Autor
 
   Drew Lanham, * um 1970, USA
 
 Titel
 
The Home Place:
      Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature
Buch-Info Milkweed Editions, 2017
      Taschenbuch, 240 Seiten, 22 CHF
     
zur Beschreibung      
       
       
 
       
     
Vorschlag von
 
   Catherine, Christine, Mumi
 
Autor
 
   Ashley M. Jones, *1990, USA
 
 Titel
 
Magic City Gospel - Poems
 
Buch-Info Hub City Press, 2017
      Kindle E-Book, 72 Seiten, 7 EUR
     
zur Beschreibung      
       
       
 
       
     
Vorschlag von
 
   Georges
 
Autorin
 
   Olga Tokarczuk, *1962, Polen
 
 Titel Die Jakobsbücher (2014)
Buch-Info Kampa Verlag, 2019
     gebunden, 1184 Seiten, 42 EUR
     Deutsch aus dem Polnischen von Lisa Palmes
 
zur Beschreibung      
       
       
 
       
     
Vorschlag von
 
   Christine
 
Autor
 
   Colum McCann, *1965, Irland
 
 Titel
 
Apeirogon (2020)
 
Buch-Info Rowohlt Hamburg, 2020
     gebunden, 588 Seiten, 37 CHF
     Deutsch aus dem Englischen von Volker Oldenburg
 
zur Beschreibung      
       
       

 
Seitenanfang
 

  

BESPRECHUNGEN · REZENSIONEN


 
The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature
 
Review by B. J. Hollars
In his debut memoir, self-described “eco-addict” J. Drew Lanham explores the connection between trees and family trees, birds and brethren, and most importantly of all, the place where mother nature and human nature meet. Taken together, it makes for a unique reading experience; one in which the book’s meditative qualities far surpass any semblance of a conventional plot. Let the reader be warned, there are no fireworks here—simply the musings of an African-American naturalist who, throughout his lifetime, has trained himself to marvel at the minor. Trust me, that is enough.
       Though the natural world remains Lanham’s main character, readers can hardly overlook his own narrative. Born in the midst of a moment of change in the segregated south, Lanham’s personal story is the story of his family history: a lineage traced back to a slave named Harry first brought to South Carolina around the turn of the 18th century. Yet as Lanham finds, there are limits even to knowing one’s own story, and over time, even the most basic facts begin to fade.
       It’s a problem Lanham has faced in his professional life as a wildlife ecology professor as well. “Day after day, semester after semester, year after year I droned on,” he writes. “Yes, I was presenting the facts. Yes, I was publishing the facts. But it seemed to me that the facts never created motivation to make things better.” Simply put: facts are only ever half the story if they don’t compel change. Yet as Lanham learns, in some instances, facts fail to persuade half as well as mysteries. “…I find myself defined these days more by what I cannot see than by what I can,” Lanham writes. Though the line is offered in reference to religion, readers can’t help but feel its reverberations take root within the subject of race.
       And what, precisely, can Lanham not see? Others birders who share his skin color. In his essay “Birding While Black,” Lanham explores his own rarity. “The chances of seeing someone who looks like me while on the trail are only slightly greater than those of sighting an ivory-billed woodpecker.” Likening himself to a thought-to-be extinct species of bird has its intended effect: a reminder to the reader that being in the minority can be felt beyond human institutions. Though Lanham doesn’t use the word privilege anywhere within his essay, that word is often felt. After all, demographically speaking, most American birders are “middle-aged, middle-class, well-educated white wom[e]n.” Perhaps his subversion of the demographic is a result of his own tinge of privilege as an academic—a privilege rarely extended to minorities.
       While the subject of race remains ever-present, Lanham skillfully filters his personal experiences through the natural lens. On the subject of ecology, Lanham concedes that he and his colleagues have “mostly done a poor job of reaching the hearts and minds” of the average citizen. Once more, his pronouncement is flooded with double-meaning. As we try to preserve our natural world, he seems to imply, we can hardly overlook the racially divided world we’ve built ourselves.
       For Lanham, that world began in his birthplace of Edgefield, South Carolina, a “rich refuge for wild things”, though a place in which human dignity has been stunted. Yet despite the customs and politics that have held the place back, Lanham notes that there are still glimmers of hope to be found there. In one instance he recounts driving the family car into a ditch with his young sister on board. In this moment of crisis, a Confederate flag bumpered pick-up truck pulls to the side of the road. Lanham expects his situation to worsen, but in fact, the opposite proves true. “Ya’ll need some help?” a white man calls, and then proceeds to winch the car from the ditch and send the young African-Americans on their way. “We’d been delivered—,” Lanham marvels, “by the people I would’ve least expected to help.”
 
 
Henry County Review of Books:
Review by Rev. Amber Inscore Essick

Lanham grew up in Edgefield, South Carolina on his family’s farm. In a moving chapter, “Mamatha Takes Flight,” he chronicles his grandmother’s life on the farm woven with the simultaneous history of human flight and avian decline. That his Black grandparents, born in the late 1800s, managed to own land in rural South Carolina is remarkable. But the story of achieving ownership of property has little to do with Lanham’s message. He was a child who loved running through the woods and fields, so having a home place was the only thing that made it possible for a little Black boy to do so.
       Lanham wandered, worked, and played as a boy growing up in the country. He writes of lying still on the path to see how close vultures would come to him before he got scared and jumped up and of taking turns with his sister shooting one another in the butt with their BB gun to see if it hurt. It did. He recalls the way working with cattle set the rhythms of their life. He remembers baling hay, repairing tractors, and drinking spring water with reverence for that life. Lanham’s accounts of raising cattle and hunting on his family farm brought to mind many of the stories I’ve heard from farmer friends around here. I imagine particular old friends laughing, fretting, and working in the same ways that he grew up doing. If Ronnie Young, a beloved local teacher, cattleman, hunter, and scientist, could still be alive to read this memoir, he would have found a kindred soul in Lanham.
       In Henry County, I have shared with many friends a common love of roaming fields and woods. Many of the farmers in our church are proud and pleased to show us around and even give us permission to walk their property. In the fields, woods and barns owned by other people, I find a fine place to study and write sermons as well as a freedom to learn about and fall more deeply in love with the land itself. I much prefer being interrupted in sermon writing by a hummingbird or phoebe than the sound of the air conditioner kicking back on.
       I have enjoyed for nearly 10 years now Henry County’s hospitality. Imagine my surprise to learn, on Henry County’s first “Get on the bus” tour in 2018, that there were towns and places that Black people were not allowed or not welcome. Sitting on the bus, my husband and I listened to the Black women who grew up nearby. This town or that town was not to be visited at all. Once a family snuck a young Black woman in to do housework for them. As I asked for more information, finally the women said, “well, as a Black person you really didn’t go to any of these places without a reason or without knowing someone there.”
       That line, “You didn’t go to any of these places,” is difficult to hear. While this is not my experience of Henry County, it was theirs, and I believe them. Those with dark skin did not (and still do not) feel free to roam in the same way that white people feel free to roam in nature. This is a tragedy, one that Dr. Lanham was spared for some time because his family had their own farm with woods they could access.
       On May 31, Pentecost Sunday, when my co-pastor and I were to be in the sanctuary praying through the worship service we had mailed out to all our members, we found that we could not. Earlier that week, in New York City’s Central Park, a Black man was birding. He asked a woman in the park to leash her dog in compliance with the law, and she called the police on him. “There is an African American man threatening me!” she said to the 911 operator. This is all on video. The facts are not in question. The question this event and others have opened up for us to answer is: if a Black person cannot go birding (Christian Cooper), or jogging (Ahmaud Arbery), or sleep in their bed at night (Breonna Taylor) without the fear of violence, what do we think it is okay for a Black person to do?
       Much of Lanham’s work aims to nurture in others the love of this world that would make people want to care for it. Access to wild and cultivated land is key. His writing is beautiful. His work is insightful. He knows the value of place, and from that wellspring he has contributed much to his field of study.
       But no matter where he goes birding, he is the only person like himself that he sees. He says that Black birders are as rare as the ivory-billed woodpecker (a species listed as “extinct” since 1944). Growing up, everything Lanham dreamed of doing or becoming was represented in our cultural conversations by white people: cowboys, farmers, scientists, and pilots. Though Black farmers, scientists, and even cowboys and pilots existed, they were not represented in cultural media or even recognized by many Americans. Representation, Lanham argues, matters. Many children growing up with dreams need to see people like them doing the work they aspire to. That is why I am anxious to see farming represented in our schools. Dads and moms coming to school events in their mud boots advertise the viability of the kind of life we want to preserve here. The same representation is necessary for black farmers.
       That Sunday, we sat outside on the steps of the church in the hot sun. Holding the worship guide in one hand and ‘The Home Place’, in the other, I read John (my husband) the essay “Birding while Black.” In it, the author tells of several occasions where he was watched, followed, and sometimes directly threatened because he was a Black man out in the wilderness. Through his writing, and through the testimonies of so many black and brown people we know, it has become clear to me in the category of hospitality, we (our family, our community, our country) have a lot of work to do. Worship that morning was holy because it was a time of lament and confession. The woods, the fields, and the natural world belong to all God’s children. When we are told that there are barriers to access put up or indirectly enforced by us, as was the case in Central Park on May 25, what will we do to address them?
       Lanham’s career path and his lifelong affections have been made possible by a deep connection to the land. He grew up on a farm. His family owned the land they cared for. As a result, he belonged to a place. He was bound to the land in a way that too few Black Americans have been able to experience.
 

 
Seitenanfang
 

 
MAGIC CITY GOSPEL
 
Birmingham Times
Jones paints a sweeping picture of Southern culture in her terrific debut collection, exhibiting pride of place as well as unflinching honesty about the traumas of its historical legacy. Jones juggles the idea of the South as home with its contradictory reality, wherein the innocence of childhood is threatened by the cruelty of racism. In the poem “Nem”, Jones discusses the duality of her Southern identity, feeling like an outsider yet protected within her black community. “Inside, you tilt with excitement”, Jones writes, “You light up, a pinball machine of colloquialisms.” She continues, “you’re the only black girl in most of your classes. It is easy to blend in and stand out.” Like the collection itself, the poem showcases both the sacred and tender parts of a personal identity shaped by the South. This is also apparent in the poem “Addie, Carole, Cynthia, Denise”, in which Jones discusses the 1963 bombing of Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church and references “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah,” which originates from a racist pre–Civil War folk song (the Disney version of the song has been criticized for sweeping its racist origins under the rug and reinforcing racist stereotypes). Through rich imagery and fluid language, Jones paints a complete picture of the South without sugarcoating the truth.
 

 
Seitenanfang
 

 
DIE JAKOBSBÜCHER
 
Frankfurter Rundschau 10.12.2019: Judith von Sternburg
Eine der sympathischsten Figuren in diesem an sympathischen – ferner auch weniger sympathischen – Figuren reichen Buch ist der katholische Geistliche Benedykt Chmielowski (1700-1763): ein bescheidener Mann aus und in der polnischen Provinz und Autor der seinerzeit vielbeachteten Enzyklopädie «Neues Athen». Alles, was man wissen kann, in zwei Bänden. Am Anfang ist Chmielowski beim Besuch eines Rabbi zu erleben, mit dem er gerne Bücher tauschen würde. Die beiden haben Verständigungsschwierigkeiten, hier Hebräisch und Jiddisch, dort Lateinisch und Polnisch, der Dolmetscher ist inkompetent. Einerseits stoßen Welten aufeinander, andererseits beugen sich die Männer trotz der babylonischen Verwirrung bald interessiert über die Bilder in Athanasius Kirchers «Turris Babel», von Chmielowski als Lockmittel mitgebracht.
       "Läsen die Menschen dieselben Bücher, lebten sie in derselben Welt – so aber leben sie in einer jeweils anderen, wie die Chinesen, von denen Kircher schreibt", erklärt Chmielowski, der beim smarten Juden mit seinem Enthusiasmus vorerst aufläuft, aber nicht bei der ebenfalls historischen Poetin Elzbieta Druzbacka (1695-1765). Mit ihr entspannt sich nach einer ersten scheuen Begegnung ein angeregter, ja neckischer und sogar leidenschaftlicher Briefwechsel. Chmielowskis enzyklopädisches Projekt überrascht sie und leuchtet ihr ein – "Imaginiert doch nur: alles zur Hand, in jeder Bibliothek. Das gesammelte menschliche Wissen in einem" –, und natürlich ist es das Internet, was die Aufklärer des 18. Jahrhunderts vorwegnehmen. In der abgelegenen polnischen Pfarrei mit nicht weniger Herzblut als (außerhalb dieses Romans) im Paris der Enzyklopädisten. Das Internet mit allen Schikanen und Tücken: die Fülle der Möglichkeiten, die fabelhafte Zugänglichkeit – die kluge Druzbacka ist es auch, die sofort begreift, dass der Pfarrer besser nicht lateinisch, sondern polnisch schreiben sollte –, das Halbwissen, das Unsortierte, die Illusion von Vollständigkeit.
       Olga Tokarczuks «Die Jakobsbücher» ist ein historischer Roman über unsere Zeit und vielleicht über jede Zeit, wie sich jede Zeit gerade in einer anderen, entfernten Zeit besonders gut erkennen kann. «Die Jakobsbücher» finden das Fremd- und Befremdetsein nicht nur unproblematisch, sondern feiern es sogar. Der titelgebende jüdische Mystiker und Religionsführer, um nicht direkt zu sagen: der jüdische Messias Jakob Frank schärft das seinen Anhängern ein, führt es ihnen auch immer wieder vor. "Fremd zu sein, weckt Wendigkeit und Geistesschärfe. Wer fremd ist, gewinnt einen neuen Standpunkt, er wird, ob er will oder nicht, ein wahrer Weiser. Wer hat uns eingeredet, dass es gut und trefflich sei, stets und ständig dazuzugehören? Nur der Fremde versteht die Welt."
       Darum erzählt auch Jakob eine Ringparabel, aber bei ihm endet sie so: "Eben so wie diese drei Ringe sind die drei Religionen. Und wer in der einen geboren wurde, sollte die beiden anderen nehmen wie Schuhe und sich auf den Weg machen zur Erlösung." Das ist es, was er tut und was er lehrt: "Wer Erlösung sucht, muss Sorge tragen, dass drei Dinge Veränderung erfahren: der Ort seiner Wohnstatt, sein Name, seine Taten."
       Im Untertitel steht bereits alles Wesentliche: «Eine große Reise über sieben Grenzen, durch fünf Sprachen und drei große Religionen, die kleinen nicht mitgerechnet. Eine Reise, erzählt von den Toten und von der Autorin ergänzt mit der Methode der Konjektur, aus mancherlei Büchern geschöpft und bereichert durch die Imagination, die größte natürliche Gabe des Menschen. Den Klugen zum Gedächtnis, den Landsleuten zur Besinnung, den Laien zur erbaulichen Lehre, den Melancholikern zur Zerstreuung".
       Es zeigt sich also Tokarczuks Freude an Weitschweifigkeit – dem Barock nicht fremd, aber unseren Jahren auch nicht –, die jedoch keine Manier ist, sondern sehr konkret und von beträchtlicher Schärfe. Denn was zum Beispiel bietet das Buch denn «den Landsleuten zur Besinnung»? Den Blick darauf, dass in Polen seit jeher die Völker miteinander zurechtkommen mussten, dass in Polen polnisch, jiddisch, deutsch und vieles mehr gesprochen wurde. Dass nicht alle Menschen, die in Polen gelebt haben, Katholiken waren. Dass die Katholiken vielleicht nicht einmal der gescheiteste Teil an Polen sind. Dass das alles nicht einfach ist, aber auch nicht schlimm, vielleicht sogar schön, jedenfalls ein Fakt.
       «Die Jakobsbücher» sind ein ausuferndes Buch, in dem sich aber nichts überflüssiges findet. Die "andere Seitennummerierung" – die Seitenzahlen laufen aus unserer Sicht rückwärts – "ist eine Verbeugung vor den hebräischen Büchern", so die Autorin in den Schlussbemerkungen, "zugleich möchte sie daran erinnern, dass jede Ordnung eine Frage der Gewohnheit ist". Dadurch entsteht auch der Sog eines gewaltigen Countdowns, der am Ende den Zeitraum zwischen 1752 – Chmielowski besucht Elischa Schor – und dem Zweiten Weltkrieg umfasst. Denn 1942 finden fünf jüdische Familien, 38 Personen im Alter von fünf Monaten bis 79 Jahren Schutz vor ihren deutschen Verfolgern ausgerechnet in jener Höhle, in die Jahrhunderte zuvor der unsterbliche Leichnam von Tante Jenta gebracht worden ist – zu ihrer Sicherheit in unruhigen Zeiten.
       Es gibt viele Klammern in diesem Buch, Tante Jenta ist die stillste und gewaltigste: Sie liegt im Sterben, damit aber eine große Hochzeit nicht verschoben werden muss, soll sie noch ein bisschen weiterleben. Das kabbalistische Zauberwerk nimmt einen außerplanmäßigen Verlauf (eine Verfluchung erweist sich nachher als weit effizienter). Tante Jenta lebt nicht mehr, sie ist aber auch nicht tot. Sie sieht alles, was im Buch geschieht, was zuvor geschah und was geschehen wird. Der kluge Arzt Ascher Rubin "ist überzeugt davon, dass die meisten Menschen dumm sind und dass die Dummheit der Menschen die Trauer in die Welt bringt. Weder ist es eine Sünde noch eine angeborene Eigenschaft, sondern eine falsche Anschauung, eine irrige Bewertung dessen, was die Augen sehen. Letzten Ende betrachten die Menschen jedes Ding einzeln, losgelöst von allen anderen. Die wahre Weisheit liegt in der Kunst, alles mit allem zu verbinden, dann erst tritt die wirkliche Gestalt der Dinge zutage."
       Die triftigste Klammer ist das Leben des Jakob Frank, 1726 in einer jüdischen Siedlung in Polen-Litauen geboren (heute gehört der Ort Koroliwka zur Ukraine), und 1791 in Offenbach am Main gestorben. Der Gründer und Messias der zwischenzeitlich riesigen Gemeinde der Frankisten, der zum Islam und später gemeinsam mit seinen Anhängern zum Katholizismus konvertierte, tritt uns als charismatische, eigenwillige Figur entgegen, als einziger ausschließlich aus der Sicht seiner Umgebung geschildert. Seine immer wieder überraschenden Wendungen und Ideen sind Freude und Schrecken zugleich – er selbst bleibt wahrlich eine befremdliche, übergriffige Gestalt, keine der sympathischen.
       Die Frankisten, durchaus Fanatiker in einer fanatischen, endzeitlich gestimmten Zeit (in weiter Ferne, so nah), leben in einer Art Kommune, die sich eigene Regeln gibt. Promiskuität und freisinniges Denken gehören dazu, Frauen reden, rechnen, rechten mit und interessieren sich dafür, "Nein sagen zu dürfen". Gitla, die ihre eigenen Wege geht, hat von einer Methode aus Frankreich gelesen, kleinen Kapuzen aus Schafsdarm, in denen der Samen hängenbleibt. Die möchte sie haben und auf dem Wochenmarkt an alle Frauen verteilen, damit sie nicht immer schwanger oder im Wochenbett oder mit Kind an der Brust sein müssen.
       Das ist kein Utopia, aber doch das Angebot, dass alles auch anders sein könnte, und dass schon immer alles auch anders sein konnte. Dass der Mensch freier ist, als er glaubt. Außer er ist ein Bauer. "Jude zu sein, ist schlecht, denkt Schor bei sich, ein Jude hat es schwer; doch Bauer zu sein, ist noch schlimmer. Einen größeren Fluch gibt es kaum." Auch er gehört zu den unvergesslichen Figuren im Roman: Der mehrfach geflohene, immer wieder eingefangene Jan, der schließlich halbtot im Schnee liegengelassen wird. Die Juden retten und pflegen ihn, sein Gesicht von den Erfrierungen entsetzlich entstellt. Später liefern sie ihn bei Chmielowski ab, der sich jetzt um ihn kümmern muss. Dass der Mensch nicht gut ist, heißt noch lange nicht, dass er schlecht ist. "Ich aber glaube, dass jeder Mensch mit seinem ganzen Wesen spürt, was wirklich wahr ist. Er will es nur nicht wissen", sagt Nachman, Jakobs Chronist, der nachher als Judas auftritt, weil er glaubt, das müsse er tun.
       Tokarczuk ist eine sehr entspannte Erzählerin, mit Sinn für Schrecken, Vergnügen und Witz einer Situation. Die Verlegenheit eines allzu reich beschenkten Kindes. Die Vorfreude beim öffnen eines Briefes. Die Gewalttat, die nicht zu überleben ist, selbst wenn man sie überlebt. Tokarczuk schlägt einen nur sporadisch altertümelnden Ton an, jedenfalls lassen Lisa Palmes und Lothar Quinkenstein in ihrer übersetzung selten und dann sehr elegant einen solchen anklingen – am häufigsten, wenn Briefe gewechselt oder Aufzeichnungen niedergeschrieben werden. Etliche im Roman schreiben wie besessen, um zu verstehen und zurechtzukommen in einer Welt, die mindestens so kompliziert ist wie die unsrige. Andere reden wie besessen. Die Sprache ist der Schlüssel zu allem: "Welcher Sprache jemand sich bedienet im Sprechen, derer bedienet er sich auch im Denken."
       Immer wieder wird im Laufe des Geschehens und der Jahre jemand gleichmütig oder interessiert Chmielowskis «Neues Athen» aufschlagen. Bücher und Ideen finden ihren Weg. Dass dieser Roman, in dem auch der Tod haust und wütet, trotzdem so hoffnungs- und lebensvoll ist, macht die 57 Jahre alte Olga Tokarczuk zu einer erschütternd idealen Literaturnobelpreisträgerin.
       Es zeigt sich also Tokarczuks Freude an Weitschweifigkeit – dem Barock nicht fremd, aber unseren Jahren auch nicht –, die jedoch keine Manier ist, sondern sehr konkret und von beträchtlicher Schärfe. Denn was zum Beispiel bietet das Buch denn «den Landsleuten zur Besinnung»? Den Blick darauf, dass in Polen seit jeher die Völker miteinander zurechtkommen mussten, dass in Polen polnisch, jiddisch, deutsch und vieles mehr gesprochen wurde. Dass nicht alle Menschen, die in Polen gelebt haben, Katholiken waren. Dass die Katholiken vielleicht nicht einmal der gescheiteste Teil an Polen sind. Dass das alles nicht einfach ist, aber auch nicht schlimm, vielleicht sogar schön, jedenfalls ein Fakt.
 

 
Seitenanfang
 

 
APEIROGON
 
LiteraturReich 19.08.2020: Petra Reich
 
Apeirogon - der Titel des neuen Romans von Colum McCann - bezeichnet eine geometrische Figur, die eine zählbar unendliche Menge an Seiten besitzt. Dies ist aber nicht die einzige mathematische Metapher, die der Autor verwendet, so kommen verschiedene Male auch die «befreundeten Zahlen» vor, die jeweils gleich der Summe der echten Teiler der anderen Zahl sind (z.B. 220 und 284), das Apeirogon ist aber Programm.
       Zum einen, was den Aufbau des Buches betrifft. Nicht zählbar unendliche, aber doch für einen Roman stattliche 1000 kurze und kürzeste Kapitel umfasst der Roman, manche bestehen lediglich aus einem kurzen Satz, einem Bild oder einem Foto. 499 davon laufen auf die Mitte des Werkes zu, wo, abgetrennt durch je zwei ganzseitige Fotos von sanften Wellen auf dem Wasser (es könnten auch Wellenmuster im Wüstensand sein), die beiden Kapitel 500 wie in einem Raum der Stille eingefangen sind. Ganz recht, die beiden Kapitel 500. Denn es gibt derer zwei und danach läuft die Nummerierung der nachfolgenden wieder absteigend bis zu einem abschließenden Kapitel 1. Zentrum des Romans ist die 1001. Und hier, auf gerade einmal eineinhalb Seiten und in einem einzigen langen Satz, finden wir die komplette Rahmenhandlung von Apeirogon. Zusammengefasst lautet er:
"Vor nicht allzu langer Zeit in einem nicht allzu fernen Land fuhr Rami Elhanan, Israeli, Jude (…) mit dem Motorrad von einem Jerusalemer Vorort zum Kloster Cremisan in der mehrheitlich von Christen bewohnten Stadt Bait Dschala, im judäischen Bergland, bei Bethlehem, um sich dort mit Bassam Aramin zu treffen, Palästinenser, Muslim (…)"
 
REALE PERSONEN
 
Rami Elhanan und Bassam Aramin sind reale Personen. Ihr Zusammentreffen allein schon bemerkenswert im israelisch-palästinensischen Konflikt, in dem sich beide Seiten so oft unversöhnlich gegenüberstehen. Sie eint nicht nur eine Freundschaft, sondern ein gemeinsames Schicksal und eine gemeinsame Mission. Beide haben ihre Töchter durch Gewalt verloren: Smadar Elhanan starb bei einem Selbstmordattentat palästinensischer Terroristen auf der Jerusalemer Ben-Jehuda-Straße im September 1997, dreizehnjährig; Abir Aramin starb als Zehnjährige durch ein von einem jungen israelischen Grenzpolizisten abgefeuertes Gummigeschoss. Ihre Väter Rami und Bassam betrachten es als ihre Mission, immer wieder vom Tod ihrer Töchter zu erzählen, in Schulen, in Seminaren, wohin immer man sie einlädt.
       In einem dieser Seminare, auf denen die beiden von ihrem Verlust, von der Notwendigkeit, beide Seiten des Konflikts zum Miteinanderreden zu bewegen, die Besatzung Palästinas als Auslöser der Gewalt zu beenden und so eine Chance für eine Befriedung Israels zu schaffen, saß, auch das erfährt man in diesem zentralen 1001. Kapitel, der amerikanische Schriftsteller Colum McCann. Die Erzählungen von Rami und Bassam auf diesem Seminar bilden die beiden 500. Kapitel, die der Autor mit deren Einverständnis hier widergeben darf (so wie er auch das Einverständnis besitzt, mit ihren Geschichten schriftstellerisch relativ frei umzugehen).
       Und wie Scheherazade in den Erzählungen aus 1001 Nacht, die Colum McCann für den Aufbau von Apeirogon sicher Inspiration waren, ist es ein Widerstand gegen den Tod, erzählen die beiden Männer hier um das Leben. Das verlorene Leben ihrer Töchter und all die durch die Gewalt bedrohten Leben, wenn der Konflikt nicht irgendwann beigelegt werden kann. Ihr Ziel ist es auch, den Schmerz, den sie erleiden müssen, für andere zu verhindern.
 
APEIROGON
 
Das Apeirogon ist also Programm für den komplexen formalen Aufbau des Romans, es ist aber auch Sinnbild für die unendlich vielen unterschiedlichen Sichtweisen auf den israelisch-palästinensischen Konflikt, die unzähligen Standpunkte, die Unübersichtlichkeit der verschiedenen Lager, die Widersprüchlichkeit. All das sind Dinge, die eine Lösung des Konflikts erschweren.
       Und während Rami nun in der Rahmenhandlung an diesem Herbsttag im Jahr 2016 mit dem Motorrad zum Ort des Seminars, dem Kloster Cremisan, und anschließend Bassam mit dem Auto nach Hause in die palästinensische Stadt Anata im zentralen Westjordanland fährt, erfahren wir nicht nur viel vom Leben der beiden, von ihren Töchtern, deren Tod und der unendlichen Trauer darüber, von den Organisationen, die die Väter gegründet haben, die Combatants for Peace und den Parents Circle, über den sich die beiden auch kennengelernt haben. Wir dringen auch ganz tief in den israelisch-palästinensischen Konflikt ein, erfahren, wie demütigend und beschwerlich das Leben für die meisten Palästinenser unter der Besatzung ist, wie verhärtet die Fronten, wie leicht auf beiden Seiten Gewalt entstehen kann. Für Rami und Bassam sind ihre Töchter Opfer von Opfern. Opfer der andauernden Besatzung Palästinas und der Unfähigkeit der Regierungen, Frieden zu schließen.
 
MOSAIKSTEINCHEN
 
Colum McCann, der durch die Schilderungen der beiden Väter sehr berührt wurde und der während seiner irischen Kindheit den Nordirland-Konflikt miterlebte, wählt für Apeirogon eine absolut fragmentarische Erzählweise. Zu den Geschichten von Rami und Bassam, ihren Töchtern und Familien und der Schilderung der Gegebenheiten in Israel und den palästinensischen Gebieten kommen kleine Splitter und Mosaiksteinchen aus unterschiedlichsten Richtungen. Immer wieder erscheinen Vögel, die auch bei der Gestaltung von Buch und Buchumschlag Verwendung fanden. Zugvögel, die ihre Route über den Nahen Osten führt, der Ortolan beispielsweise, der auch als leicht makabre Delikatesse gilt, aber auch Falken, Adler und immer wieder die Taube in ihrer Funktion als Friedenssymbol. Da gibt es die Steinschleuder, die zur Jagd auf Vögel benutzt wird. Die aber auch bei der Intifada, dem Krieg der Steine, benutzt wurde.
       Ein Forschungsreisender aus dem 19. Jahrhundert, Sir Richard Francis Burton, kommt darin vor, ebenso der französische Hochseilartist Philippe Petit, der Jerusalem auf dem Seil überquerte. Der irische Priester Christopher Costigan, der im 19. Jahrhundert den Jordan und das Tote Meer erforschte bekommt genauso seinen Platz wie die palästinensische Studentin Dalia el-Fahum, die in der Wüste Tonaufnahmen machte und dabei umkam. Eine Aufführung von Verdis Requiem im Konzentrationslager steht neben dem Halberstädter Orgelprojekt von John Cage, «As slow as possible». Auschwitz und Theresienstadt sind als Hintergrund immer präsent.
 
FORMAL KUNSTVOLL
 
Diese ganzen Splitter sind aber keineswegs beliebig, sondern Teil der äußerst kunstvollen Komposition des ganzen Buchs. Nach einer kurzen Zeit des Einlesens entdeckt die Leserin sehr schnell Zusammenhänge, die musikalische Struktur, die wie eine Fuge vielstimmig, aber mit strengem Aufbau ist. So tauchen auch bestimmte Motive immer wieder auf. So die Mauer, die das Land, aber auch seine Menschen durchzieht; das Bild der kollabierenden Lunge; das Zitat "Teilt man das Leben durch den Tod, erhält man einen Kreis"; der auf Jassir Arafat zurückgehende Satz: "Lassen Sie nicht zu, dass mir der Ölzweig aus der Hand fällt." Ganz allmählich entsteht der eigentliche Roman beim Zusammen-setzen der einzelnen Fragmente im Kopf der Leserin.
       Trotz der großen Komplexität, mit der Colum McCann Apeirogon formal gestaltet hat, liest sich das Buch nach einer kurzen Anlaufzeit sehr gut, gerät die Leserin nachgerade in einen Erzählsog mit steigender Intensität, deren Höhepunkt sicher die Geschichten von Rami und Bassam in der Mitte sind. In den nachfolgenden Kapiteln dann auf die Fotos der beiden getöteten Mädchen zu stoßen, ist äußerst berührend. Die kunstvolle Komposition und die Symmetrie der Erzählung beeindrucken.
 
DER ISRAELISCH-PALÄSTINENSISCHE KONFLIKT
 
Natürlich bietet Colum McCann mit Apeirogon keinen Lösungsansatz für den israelisch-palästinensischen Konflikt, noch nicht einmal einen Versuch, den kompletten Durchblick zu erlangen. Es ist vielmehr ein Appell, einander zuzuhören, eine Hoffnung auf ein Ende der Gewalt, einen Verzicht auf Rache, ein Versuch, Empathie zu wecken. Zugleich ist das Buch ein großartiger Versuch über Trauer, Vergänglichkeit und die Zeit. Und ein absolutes Meisterwerk.
       Colum McCann steht mit Apeirogon auf der diesjährigen Longlist des Booker Prize. Ich kenne bisher nur drei der dreizehn Kandidaten. Und obwohl ich Hilary Mantel sehr bewundere und ihren dritten Teil der Cromwell-Saga absolut großartig finde und Ann Tyler sehr liebe, ist mein Favorit ab sofort Apeirogon.
 

 
Seitenanfang
 

  

TURNUS

CATHERINE JUN 19 JAN 20 JUL 21
GEORGES JUL 19 JUL 20
CHRISTINE AUG 19 SEP 20
PETER OKT 19 MAI 20
MUMI NOV 19 MAI 21
MUMI-ZOOM DEZ 20 JAN 21 MAR 21
 
 
 
 
Seitenanfang
 

  

ARCHIV

Texte, die besprochen wurden


         
Andrzej Stasiuk   Die Welt hinter Dukla   NOV 2000
Karl-Emil Franzos Der Pojaz
Bruno Schulz Die Zimtläden JUN 2001
 
Alison Louise Kennedy Alles was du brauchst
Hanna Krall Die Untermieterin
Andrzej Stasiuk Neun OKT 2002
 
Josef Škvorecký Feiglinge
Virginia Woolf Mrs Dalloway
James Joyce Dubliner
James Joyce Ulysses
Durs Grünbein Vom Schnee
Colson Whitehead John Henry Days OKT 2004
Hier könnte etwas fehlen.
 
Mark Twain Zu Fuß durch Europa
Raymond Carver Was ist denn?
Raymond Carver Was ist in Alaska?
Richard Ford Ruf
Richard Ford Abgrund
Wolfgang Goethe Wahlverwandtschaften
Paul Nizan Das Leben des Antoine B.
Stendhal Rot und Schwarz NOV 2005
 
Alessandro Manzoni Die Brautleute
Thomas Bernhard Ein Kind
Thomas Bernhard Frost
Henry James Daisy Miller
Primo Levi Ist das ein Mensch?
Anton Tschechow Eine langweilige Geschichte
Anton Tschechow Die Dame mit dem Hündchen
Alexander Puschkin Pique Dame
Alexander Puschkin Die Hauptmannstochter
Felicitas Hoppe Johanna DEZ 2006
 
Orhan Pamuk Das schwarze Buch
Norbert Gstrein Die englischen Jahre
Peter Weiss Abschied von den Eltern
Kevin Vennemann Mara Kogoj
Gottfried Keller
Der grüne Heinrich   ???
DEZ 2007
 
Ulrich Peltzer Teil der Lösung
Zsuzsa Bánk Der Schwimmer
Christina Viragh Im April
Veit Heinichen Gib jedem seinen eigenen Tod
Patricia Highsmith Leute, die an die Tür klopfen
Patricia Highsmith Elie’s Lebenslust NOV 2008
 
Edgar Allan Poe Mord in der Rue Morgue
Franz Kafka Das Schloss
Franz Kafka Der Verschollene
Friedrich Dürrenmatt Der Winterkrieg im Tibet
Alice Munroe Wozu wollen Sie das wissen?
Ingo Schulze Simple Stories
Katrin Seglitz Der Bienenkönig DEZ 2009
 
Herta Müller Die Atemschaukel
Gottfried Keller Der grüne Heinrich
Ilma Rakusa Mehr Meer
Joseph von Eichendorff Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts
E. T. A. Hoffmann Der Sandmann
E. T. A. Hoffmann Kreisleriana
Jean Paul Des Luftschiffers Giannozzo Seebuch
Lew Tolstoj Kreuzersonate DEZ 2010
 
Sofja Tolstaja Eine Frage der Schuld
Lew Tolstoj Hadschi Murat
Melinda Nadj Abonji Tauben fliegen auf
Chalid al-Chamissi Im Taxi: Unterwegs in Kairo
Alaa al-Aswani Der Jakubijân-Bau
Nagib Mafous Die Midaq-Gasse
Hisham Matar Im Land der Männer
Rosa Yassin Hassan Ebenholz NOV 2011
 
Mansura Eseddin Hinter dem Paradies
Eileen Chang Das goldene Joch
Eileen Chang Gefahr und Begierde
Eugen Ruge In Zeiten des abnehmenden Lichts
Reto Camenisch Hinter dem Bahnhof
Gaute Heivoll Bevor ich verbrenne
Kerstin Ekman Hundeherz DEZ 2012
 
S. Corinna Bille Dunkle Wälder
Felicitas Hoppe Hoppe
Christine Lavant Das Wechselbälgchen
Richard Yates Eine gute Schule
Sloan Wilson Der Mann im grauen Flanell
Christoph Ransmayr Atlas eines ängstlichen Mannes
Karl-Markus Gauß Das Erste, was ich sah
Wolfgang Herrndorf Tschick NOV 2013
 
Denis Diderot Rameaus Neffe
Albert Camus Der erste Mensch
Goran Petrović Ein Sternenzelt aus Stuck
Katja Petrowskaja Vielleicht Esther
Zadie Smith London NW
Karl Kraus Die letzten Tage der Menschheit
Wolf Haas Brennerova NOV 2014
 
Marlene Streeruwitz Die Reise einer jungen Anarchistin
William Faulkner Schall und Wahn
Günter Grass Katz und Maus
John Williams Stoner
João Ricardo Pedro Wohin der Wind uns weht
José Saramago Claraboia NOV 2015
 
Umberto Eco NullNUMMER
Leta Semadeni Tamangur
David Grossman Kommt ein Pferd in die Bar
David Grossman Aus der Zeit fallen
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing Nathan der Weise
Teju Cole Jeder Tag gehört dem Dieb
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Americanah
Wole Soyinka Die Ausleger DEZ 2016
 
William Faulkner Absalom, Absalom!  
Gerhard Meier
Gerhard Meier
Toteninsel
Die Ballade vom Schneien
 
Claude Simon Das Gras  
Julian Barnes Der Lärm der Zeit  
Melinda Nagj Abonji Schildkrötensoldat NOV 2017
 
Hisham Matar Die Rückkehr  
Christoph Ransmayr Cox oder Der Lauf der Zeit  
Richard Ford Frank  
Anna Felder Die nächsten Verwandten  
Cesare Pavese Der Mond und die Feuer  
Maxim Ossipow Nach der Ewigkeit  
Samuel Selvon Die Taugenichtse NOV 2018
 
Peter Stamm Die sanfte Gleichgültigkeit der Welt  
Kurt Guggenheim Alles in Allem  
Annie Ernaux La place / Der Platz  
Annie Ernaux Les années / Die Jahre  
T. C. Boyle Good Home · Stories  
Theodor Fontane Der Stechlin  
Saša Stanišić Herkunft NOV 2019
 
Pascale Kramer Une famille / Eine Familie  
Klaus Merz Der Argentinier  
Klaus Merz Jakob schläft  
Erica Pedretti Kuckuckskind   oder
   Was ich ihr unbedingt noch sagen wollte
Giovanni Orelli Der lange Winter  
Fabio Andina Tage mit Felice DEZ 2020
 
Olga Tokarczuk Gesang der Fledermäuse  
George Orwell 1984  
Maya Angelou Ich weiß, warum der gefangene Vogel singt
   

 
Seitenanfang